Testing alphabetas rc's & daily-builds

  • skullnotions
Posted: Sun, 03/22/2009 - 06:47
Hi All, The aim is the released version. I have just installed the latest 64studio_master image on a multi partition disk. This saw the removal of my oldest 64studio 2.0 dist-upgraded to 2.1 dist-upgraded to lenny version. I don't find much time for computer music composition so helping users with software use and problems is not one of my strong points, but we have many 64studio users who shine in this field. Checkout Quentins forum and 64studio mailing lists. We have a flexible team and one of the best developers available. The community is at the heart 64 studio and I have no doubt in saying the community either makes or breaks any distribution. I remember reading how important it is to put something back in to the GNU\Linux community and I fully agree. Cash donations are one way to support your distro but contributing to the community is top of the list to me. I have lost count of the dist-uprades installs I've done after 2.1 was released and leading to the 3.0 release but I do keep documents\history. This is the first step I think to testing. I don't remember the install, setup, configure process. I make use of the systems strong points. Today's .bash_history is tomorrows install routine. $ cp .bash_history ~/bh-today's-date.txt Is the install, setup, configure process for the next install. This simple step will reduce install setup time by half. Backup your backups, and just to be sure back them up. Happy Hacking :-) Cheers! Dave.

vi nano emacs No GUI file editing.

  • skullnotions
  • 09/29/07
  • Thu, 04/09/2009 - 10:56
When testing 64studio there will be times when you will be dropped into a terminal. X or the desktop gui will fail and you'll be looking at a black console with a white command prompt. Power users or system administrators are comfortable here. Some distros e.g. Arch linux are built from the ground up, you install using the command line and when the installation is complete you will still be looking at a console, you'll have the option to install a desktop. Gentoo was built this way also. System administrators may have multiple installs spread over different buildings so upgrading all these systems using a gui would be a nightmare, whereas a shell one-liner, piping several text processing commands, would be the easy way to update or reconfigure them all. I have to admit I'm a *command line junkie,* I often Log out of the desktop & log into a console [ctrl] + [alt] + [f1] log in as my user and play around for hours. The first rule when you are dropped into a command line is *don't panic,* the second is practice & learn the basics of a Non GUI Editor. Nano is not difficult to use. Open a terminal and run: $ nano test type or insert some text into the file. Then. [ctrl] + [o] asks you to save file. [Enter] *saves file.* [ctrl] + [x] closes nano. You should have nano pre-installed, if not, $ sudo apt-get update $ sudo apt-get install nano vi is installed by default on many GNU\Linux systems. So again it doesn't hurt to learn at least the basics of vi. My editor of choice is Emacs. 64studio 3.0 started off as 64studio "etch" dist-upgraded to ubuntu "hardy". Many dist-upgrades later the message goes upstream "Clean dist-upgrade" with "No Errors" achieved. Even as this message is traveling through the ether another 2.1 is being installed and dist-upgraded, just to double check all is ok with the dist-upgrade. Then starts the testing for the creation of the first installable image, again eventually the message goes upstream "Clean Install" with "No Errors" achieved. Dist-upgrading etch to lenny "or" hardy to intrepid is always interesting, but dist-upgrading etch to hardy is quite another journey. Next we needed to have a new kernel to keep us up to date with recent changes to hardware etc., but that's another testing journey. I watch the community as it goes about its daily routine, some trying to install this and others trying to upgrade that. Good to see 64studio moving closer to the 3.0 final. I'd like to say Thanks to all of you. You're reports are what makes the releases possible. There's certainly a community of testers evolving and you're doing a great job. If you've worked slowly through some of these howto's then you're now starting to see why I love testing. Here's a Revision of the posts: **Testing alphabetas rc's & daily-builds** 1. How can you help? 2. Unleash .bashrc .bash_history 3. package management apt dpkg synaptic 4. System Administration System Logs 5. services-daemons performance-security 6. nVidia install, FastWrite and Side Band Address 7. mount partition methods 8. graphics sound network, finding information 9. vi nano emacs, No GUI file editing Post 2."Unleash .bashrc .bash_history" takes 5-10 minutes and will reduce the time it takes to set up a clean install dramatically. Happy Hacking:-) Cheers! Dave. Kernel Testers:

graphics sound network various information

  • skullnotions
  • 09/29/07
  • Tue, 04/07/2009 - 07:56
**System Information** $ sudo fdisk -l $ sudo lshw $ sudo lshw --help $ cat /proc/meminfo |grep 'MemTotal' $ sudo dpkg -l |grep 2.6.29 $ sudo dpkg -l |grep 2.6.21 $ lspci $ lspci -v $ lspci -n *run* $ lspci -n *and paste result into here* [Debian Device Driver Check](http://kmuto.jp/debian/hcl/index.cgi/) Then you can post your Device Driver results back on to the forum. $ dmesg $ dmesg |grep pci $ lsmod $ lsmod |grep pci $ sudo grep IRQ /var/log/messages $ sudo grep IRQ /var/log/dmesg $ sudo grep IRQ /var/log/syslog $ sudo grep PCI /var/log/messages $ sudo grep PCI /var/log/dmesg $ sudo grep CPU /var/log/messages $ sudo grep CPU /var/log/syslog $ sudo grep hd /var/log/messages $ sudo grep sd /var/log/messages **Graphics information** $ lspci |grep VGA $ lspci |grep -i nvidia $ dmesg |grep video $ dmesg |grep nvidia $ grep WW /var/log/Xorg.0.log $ grep EE /var/log/Xorg.0.log $ grep II /var/log/Xorg.0.log $ grep PCI /var/log/Xorg.0.log *Use paste.ubuntu for your xorg.conf details then post your link back on to the forum* **Sound information** $ sudo modinfo soundcore $ cat /proc/interrupts $ cat /proc/asound/cards $ cat /proc/asound/modules $ cat /proc/asound/devices $ lspci |grep -i audio $ lsmod |grep snd $ lsmod |grep snd_ice1712 $ sudo grep ICE1712 /var/log/messages $ sudo grep ICE1712 /var/log/syslog $ dmesg | egrep -i '(audio|sound|snd|linux|alsa)' $ dpkg -l |grep jack $ dpkg -l |grep jackd $ dpkg -l |grep sndfile $ wodim --devices **Network information** The Unix command ifconfig can function as a tool to configure a network interface for TCP/IP from the command line interface (CLI).This is another easy tool to see if your interface is actually loading correctly. $ sudo ifconfig $ sudo ifconfig eth0 $ lspci |grep Ethernet $ lspci |grep Network $ dmesg | grep eth $ sudo dhclient $ sudo ping -c1 www.google.com $ sudo dig www.google.com $ lsof -i *"with firefox-browser running"* $ ping -c 4 google.com *The -c option is used to pass how many packets you're sending* I've used the command nmap myIP $ sudo apt-get update $ sudo apt-get install nmap $ sudo nmap -v -A myIP *"from $ sudo ifconfig"* $ sudo nmap "myIP" Route: This is very useful to check routing config $ sudo route -n Netstat: If you want to see Routing Tables, all open ports, all listen ports $ sudo netstat -nr *The -n means return numeric output (ie, IP address instead of hostname)* *The -r means print the routing table* find all open ports $ sudo netstat -a find listening ports $ sudo netstat -l The flags (-tupl) are: t: show tcp connections u: show udp connections p: show PID/name of process l: show listening sockets $ sudo netstat -tupl Variations $ sudo netstat -l -t $ sudo netstat -nr $ sudo netstat -lnp $ sudo netstat -utap $ sudo netstat -p > my-netstat-list.txt $ cat my-netstat-list.txt e.g. grep $ grep daemon my-netstat-list.txt $ grep gdm my-netstat-list.txt etc., **Various information** $ lsusb $ lspci |grep USB $ lsmod |grep usbcore Fine tune these search tools to suit your system. The forum search tool and google will help you refine your searches. The information collected using these tools is vital if you want a quick response regarding an issue posted on the forum or mailing lists. find the 50 largest flles in ~/ and create ~/bigfile.list Be patient this can take a minute $ find . -type f -exec ls -s {} \; | sort -n -r | head -50 | cat -n | tee ~/bigfile.list Cheers! Dave.

mount partition methods

  • skullnotions
  • 09/29/07
  • Tue, 03/31/2009 - 19:59
Using a livecd to rescue or repair a partition is one of the best system tools available, I use SimplyMepis as my rescue livecd. I also keep the downloaded iso on my data partition and sometimes boot the iso directly: method: $ sudo fdisk -l $ sudo mount -o loop /media/data/iso-sm8/SimplyMEPIS-CD_8.0.00-rel_32.iso /mnt/ Now you have mounted the iso you can browse and copy "initrd.gz" & "vmlinuz" from the iso to your /media/data/iso-sm8/ directory to boot from. $ cp /mnt/boot/initrd.gz /media/data/iso-sm8/ $ cp /mnt/boot/vmlinuz /media/data/iso-sm8/ $ ls -a /media/data/iso-sm8/ initrd.gz SimplyMEPIS-CD_8.0.00-rel_32.iso vmlinuz Add an entry to /boot/grub/menu.lst title ISO-SimplyMEPIS-CD_8.0.00-rel_32.iso - (boot iso) root (hd0,2) kernel /iso-sm8/vmlinuz vga=791 nosplash fromhd=/dev/hda3 fromiso=/iso-sm8/SimplyMEPIS-CD_8.0.00-rel_32.iso resume=/dev/hda2 initrd /iso-sm8/initrd.gz boot The entries "hda" could be "sda" depending on your disk and you will have to use your own partition numbers e.g. root (hd0,?) and (/dev/hda?). Now you can boot the "iso" from your menu.lst. The livecd will run from the iso. This will mount the partition containing the iso. This is useful for data recovery or repair. "Don't" Format partitions when a partition is mounted you will damage your disk. Boot the livecd as a livecd to format partitions, and make sure no partitions are mounted including swap. SimplyMepis allows you to do this from inside the partitioning software, if not as root (sudo) use the swapoff command. $ swapoff -a or swapoff /dev/hd? (sd?) To mount one partition using another. $ sudo mount -t ext3 /dev/sda4 /mnt/ $ ls -a /mnt/ Do your repair\recovery and then unmount the partition. $ sudo umount /mnt/ /dev/sda4 is just an example, use hd? or sd? depending on the contents of /dev/..... Cheers! Dave.

nVidia FastWrite and Side Band Address & gnome-terminal

  • skullnotions
  • 09/29/07
  • Mon, 04/06/2009 - 06:59
**nVidia driver install** Depends: linux-kbuild-(your kernel version $ uname -r). Make selection for your nVidia driver version from here Log out of your desktop & log into a console [ctrl] + [alt] + [f1] as root. (or use sudo) Change directory to where your nvidia driver downloaded. cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf-backup apt-get update apt-get install linux-headers & linux-source (use your version). apt-get install build-essential (*64studio 3.0*) then run telinit 3 /etc/init.d/gdm stop export CC=gcc-4.1 (*needed for 64studio 2.1*) sh NVIDIA-Linux [Tab key] will autocomplete (use your driver version). On 64studio 2.1 you now edit your xorg.conf nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf (change "nv" to "nvidia") On 64studio 3.0 versions You may have to edit\add Module\Device Sections to xorg.conf see 64studio 3.0 example here ReBoot Once you have the "nvidia" driver installed you can Check to see if FastWrite and Side Band Address is supported $ cat /proc/driver/nvidia/agp/card Fast Writes: Supported SBA: Supported AGP Rates: 4x 2x 1x Registers: 0x1f000217:0x1f000104 $ cat /proc/driver/nvidia/agp/status Status: Enabled Driver: AGPGART AGP Rate: 4x Fast Writes: Disabled SBA: Disabled $ sudo gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist ADD to the file: blacklist nvidia_agp blacklist intel_agp $ sudo gedit /etc/modprobe.d/nvidia-kernel-nkc ADD to the file: alias char-major-195* nvidia options nvidia NVreg_EnableAGPSBA=1 NVreg_EnableAGPFW=1 ReBoot: $ cat /proc/driver/nvidia/agp/status Status: Enabled Driver: NVIDIA AGP Rate: 4x Fast Writes: Enabled SBA: Enabled Using "nvidia" driver with FastWrite and Side Band Address Enabled. **gnome-terminal default size.** If you want change it's default size edit this file: sudo gedit /usr/share/vte/termcap/xterm change this line to alter the size settings. The first is the default, the second setting opens the terminal the full width of my screen. :co#80:it#8:li#24:\ :co#158:it#8:li#24:\ Cheers! Dave.

services-daemons performance-security

  • skullnotions
  • 09/29/07
  • Sun, 04/05/2009 - 14:00
Method to improve performance, memory, security and boot up time. "WARNING".....Do Not Remove these, If you don't know what they are for. This is a "GUIDE" Laptops and Desktop computers require different services. Be very careful here! Its always wise to make one change at a time. $ ps -Al $ lsmod $ cd /etc/init.d/ $ ls -a you will now see the services. $ sudo update-rc.d -f SERVICE-NAME remove For example to stop anacron service you can type command as follows: $ cd /etc/init.d/ $ sudo update-rc.d -f anacron remove check these out first, double check (google) service-name to sure. e.g. Ref: The links above are for reference. Obvious services you can remove are eg, cupsys if you have no printer. Please be careful. Research, and know what the services are for, if not sure, leave them alone. tty1 getty: is the console you woud drop to with [ctrl]+[alt]+[F1]. tty getty is also required by the system, but you probably wont use six of them. To improve security reduce the tty getty's started at boot. Also they are using valuable system memory\resources, check with: $ top (use "q" key to quit top) $ ps -Al Will show services\daemons running including tty1 tty2 tty3 etc., **tty configuration: Reduce to "three" starting during boot** $ sudo gedit /etc/default/console-setup Change: ACTIVE_CONSOLES="/dev/tty[1-6]" to ACTIVE_CONSOLES="/dev/tty[1-3]" Then: $ sudo gedit /etc/event.d/tty4 comment out: start on runlevel 2 (e.g.) #start on runlevel 2 comment out: start on runlevel 3 (e.g.) #start on runlevel 3 Do the same with $ sudo gedit /etc/event.d/tty5 $ sudo gedit /etc/event.d/tty6 ReBoot for changes to take effect. Check configuration changes: $ ps -Al $ lsmod Cheers! Dave.

System Administration System Logs

  • skullnotions
  • 09/29/07
  • Fri, 03/27/2009 - 21:53
Most users dont spend much time with system logs but 64studio "Testers" need to be able to report issues upstream or post to forums. Better to be able to send details regarding just the issues you are dealing with instead of the full system log file. Because the forum uses Markdown Syntax it could be easier to use a pastebin, see the link at the bottom of this post. Main Menu > System > Administration > System Log. or once you have key words search your logs using grep: e.g. acpi $ ls -a /var/log/ $ sudo grep acpi /var/log/messages $ sudo grep hda /var/log/messages $ sudo grep sda /var/log/messages $ sudo grep acpi /var/log/syslog $ sudo grep hda /var/log/syslog $ sudo grep sda /var/log/syslog $ sudo grep boot /var/log/boot $ sudo grep boot /var/log/dmesg $ sudo grep boot /var/log/kern.log $ sudo grep boot /var/log/lastlog $ sudo grep boot /var/log/messages $ sudo grep boot /var/log/syslog boot is just an example, use keywords that relate to the query you are interested in e.g. CPU PCI USB usb device etc., $ dmesg $ dmesg >64s30b3-dmesg.txt The second command will create 64s30b3-dmesg.txt file in your ~/ directory $ grep CPU 64s30b3-dmesg.txt $ grep PCI 64s30b3-dmesg.txt $ grep USB 64s30b3-dmesg.txt $ grep usb 64s30b3-dmesg.txt $ grep Warning 64s30b3-dmesg.txt $ grep warning 64s30b3-dmesg.txt $ cat /var/log/messages >64s30b3-messages.txt Will create 64s30b3-messages.txt file in your ~/ directory You can grep 64s30b3-messages.txt in exactly the same way you did 64s30b3-dmesg.txt System Administration Xorg.0.log $ grep WW /var/log/Xorg.0.log $ grep EE /var/log/Xorg.0.log $ grep II /var/log/Xorg.0.log $ cp .bash_history bh090327.txt $ cp bh090327.txt /media/data/backups/ If you use these methods on your present install. Today's .bash_history is tomorrows install routine. Cheers! Dave.

package management apt dpkg synaptic

  • skullnotions
  • 09/29/07
  • Tue, 04/07/2009 - 08:36
**Package management** Using the terminal is one of the main advantages of using the Debian system. **Update & Upgrade the system.** To edit and configure your sources.list run. $ sudo gedit /etc/apt/sources.list To upgrade the system run the next two commands. *Read carefully any messages before you accept the upgrade.* $ sudo apt-get update $ sudo apt-get upgrade **Search and find information about packages available & installed.** $ sudo apt-cache search "packagename" $ sudo apt-cache show "packagename" $ sudo apt-cache policy "packagename" $ sudo apt-get build-dep "packagename" $ sudo dpkg -l |grep "packagename" $ sudo dpkg -l |grep 64studio $ sudo dpkg -s 64studio $ sudo dpkg -s dpkg $ sudo dpkg -s apt Without the quotes. *If you've followed the last post ".bashrc .bash_history" you can now search the history and save it for future installs.* $ h cache $ h show $ h policy $ h build-dep $ h dpkg **To help find/remove unwanted software run** $ dpkg --get-selections > software1 and again $ dpkg --get-selections > software2 This will create 2 files in your ~/ directory, software1 & software2 These list the software installed, leave software1 alone. $ sudo grep cups software2 $ sudo grep blue software2 $ sudo grep "packagename" software2 etc., only you know what is not needed. $ sudo apt-get remove --purge "packagename" Watch very carefully for shared libs and others apt might try to remove. This method will also keep a .bash_history of the software you have removed. Check package dependencies with: $ sudo dpkg -s "packagename" $ cp .bash_history bh090327.txt $ grep install bh090327.txt $ grep remove bh090327.txt $ grep dpkg bh090327.txt Once you have removed software re-run: dpkg --get-selections > software2 software1 (default_installed_software) software2 (installed_software) You could use *$ dpkg -l* instead: $ dpkg -l $ dpkg -l >> dpkg-list-software1 $ dpkg -l >> dpkg-list-software2 **You could also research\install\remove the packages using Synaptic.** Cheers! Dave.

Unleash .bashrc .bash_history

  • skullnotions
  • 09/29/07
  • Thu, 03/26/2009 - 07:03
To help you search your bash_history. Increase your bash_history save size by adding the following to your .bashrc $ gedit .bashrc export HISTSIZE=1000000 HISTFILESIZE=1000000 At the bottom of the file in the alias section add: alias h="history|grep " now run: ". .bashrc" without the quotes (to save you having to log out & back in to your desktop) Then you can search your bash_history with: $ h sudo $ h install $ h remove $ h gedit etc., Ref .bashrc $ cp .bash_history bh090326.txt $ grep sudo bh090326.txt $ grep cp bh090326.txt $ grep install bh090326.txt $ grep remove bh090326.txt $ h grep $ cp bh090321.txt /media/data/backups/ grep & find inside many files in a directory. If you have a directory with many files inside and you want to search for a string in all the files inside. e.g. I keep a directory with all my bash_history backups then: cd /media/data/backups/ $ grep install * $ grep remove * $ grep sudo * etc., When testing these tools can save a great deal of time. The new install can be quickly configured to your preferences, and build-software\favourite software reinstalled without fuss. Today's .bash_history is tomorrows install routine. Cheers! Dave.

64studio How can you help?

  • skullnotions
  • 09/29/07
  • Mon, 04/06/2009 - 08:14
At this point in time my 64studio Testing installs include: 64studio 2.1 dist-upgraded lenny. (+ kde4 desktop). 64studio 3.0 beta2 upgraded to beta3 (kernel-builds-testing). 64studio 3.0 beta3. (x2 installs on different PC's) 64studio master build 07-Mar-2009 15:23 728M. 64studio 3.0 built using pdk. **How can you help?** 1) Send\post any errors, issues you find to forum\mailing list. **Post as much info about your computer\system as possible** This makes helping with the issues much easier & faster. 2) Send\post any positive findings. Things you like the most. 3) Help out on the forums, Share your knowledge. 4) Test the distro and post reports. 5) keep a clean spirit, open mind & respect for others feelings. 6) Don't be afraid to ask questions. 7) Write HowTo's help documents and guides 8) Name your Subject & Thread Topics on the forum with Titles that are relevant to your query. This will make the Forum Search function better for everyone. **How can 64studio help you?** 1) Keep the Forum up to date and user friendly. 2) Provide a community Wiki Page. **Tip: Copy\Paste or just Select\Paste.** Left click to "select" text from the forum page, and middle click straight into a teminal. Or copy the text from the post e.g. "System Administration System Logs" to a file.txt in your ~/ directory, e.g. system-logs.txt and use cat. $ cat system-logs.txt This will show the contents of the file in the terminal, again left click to "select" text from the terminal, and middle click straight underneath to run the command. There is no need to copy\paste when using GNU\Linux :) $ grep grep system-logs.txt Will show just the grep commands. $ grep var system-logs.txt Will narrow down the search. Cheers! Dave. **Debian GNU/Linux device driver check page** http://lists.64studio.com/mailman/listinfo/64studio-users http://lists.64studio.com/mailman/listinfo/64studio-devel http://lists.64studio.com/mailman/listinfo/pdk-devel