32 and 64 bit on the same HDD?

  • cyrille
Posted: Tue, 06/03/2008 - 13:27
Hello: I have 64 Studio 2.0 running fine on 3 workstations, I would like to install a 32 Bit version too as some software I need to use do not work on 64bit ( like vuescan and acrobat ) is it possible to have both on the same HDD? if yes how do I proceed? thank you Cyrille

"dedicated google search"

  • Icemouse
  • 08/04/07
  • Sat, 06/07/2008 - 08:00
Hi Ethanay :) Sometimes the Non-Linux-Google will be better. If you are browsing with Mozilla browsers like Iceweasel, try the add-on CustomizeGoogle. Cheers, Ralf

haha

  • ethanay
  • 05/20/08
  • Sat, 06/07/2008 - 06:58
well, you can do that do (i don't have the luxury b/c i'm on a laptop!) glad it worked out ok and Ralf: thanks for the link, didn't know there was a dedicated google search :)

Always a help, if you won't wait for postings

  • Icemouse
  • 08/04/07
  • Wed, 06/04/2008 - 09:32
http://www.google.com/linux :) Cheers, Ralf

32 an 64

  • cyrille
  • 07/14/07
  • Fri, 06/06/2008 - 16:23
to all: I took the safe way and added a drive to the workstation and installed the 32 bit version on it and vuescan works fine now. thank you

Shrink the swap

  • Icemouse
  • 08/04/07
  • Wed, 06/04/2008 - 09:26
Sometimes there's the need for logical partitions, but there's no need to have something around 6GB for the swap. When I used 256MB RAM my swap was 1024MB - 256MB = 768MB. When I used 1280MB RAM my swap was 1GB. Now I'm using 1920MB RAM and my swap still is 1GB. It will help to run top, to see how much of the swap space is used. I agree to shrink the swap. I'm short in time, so I can't help right now.

hmmm...

  • ethanay
  • 05/20/08
  • Wed, 06/04/2008 - 09:01
that is a strange partitioning scheme IMO. why so many logical partitions? what partitions do you have data on that needs to be preserved? are any empty? i think it is best to use a primary partition (xda1-4) to boot from, but don't have much knowledge to back that up :) but you can use on first observation: you probably can shrink your swap partition from 6gb to =RAM size or a little more if you use hibernate, or =6gb, and install 32-bit 64studio on that. As for the extra partitions, it isn't really necessary unless you have a special purpose for them. Here is my cfdisk: sda1 Boot Primary Linux ext3 10487.24 sda3 Primary Linux ext3 10487.24 Pri/Log Free Space 2097.45 sda5 Logical Linux ext3 94812.81 sda6 Logical Linux swap / Solaris 2146.80 Ubuntu 8.04 is on /dev/sda1. 64studio (will be) on /dev/sda3. /dev/sda2 is extended partition which includes /dev/sda5 (/home for Ubuntu) and /dev/sda6 (swap). I have 2gb of ram, so I use slightly >2gb swap to protect hibernation. I also have free space to allow for some "wiggle room" if I need it...actually it is more accidental than anything and I will probably move ~300mb to swap and the rest to /dev/sda5. I use /dev/sda5 in Ubuntu for all my main files (mostly, music files take up a lot of space!). For 64studio, I save some stuff to /home in /dev/sda3, but add /dev/sda5 in the /etc/fstab to mount at boot time so I have normal access to it. I don't mount it as /home, though, because it will confuse things between the two operating systems. basically, it looks like you have some finagling to do with the hard drive partitions...which brings us back to the beginning: make a backup in case lightning strikes :p ps Ralf -- i stand corrected :p finagle's law of dynamic negatives...that is the technical term :) i speak colloquial :D

thank you all, now how to proceed...?

  • cyrille
  • 07/14/07
  • Wed, 06/04/2008 - 08:00
Here my fdisk -l Disk /dev/hda: 60.0 GB, 60022480896 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 7297 cylinders Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/hda1 * 1 34 273073+ 83 Linux /dev/hda2 35 7297 58340047+ 5 Extended /dev/hda5 35 642 4883728+ 83 Linux /dev/hda6 643 1007 2931831 83 Linux /dev/hda7 1008 1758 6032376 82 Linux swap / Solaris /dev/hda8 1759 1807 393561 83 Linux /dev/hda9 1808 7297 44098393+ 83 Linux and what cfdisk says: Name Flags Part Type FS Type [Label] Size (MB) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ hda1 Boot Primary Linux ext3 279.66 hda5 Logical Linux ext3 5000.98 hda6 Logical Linux ext3 3002.23 hda7 Logical Linux swap / Solaris 6177.19 hda8 Logical Linux ext3 403.04 hda9 Logical Linux ext3 45156.79 whad do you suggest? backing up the data? on hd9 free hda9? repartition hd9, how? install the 32 bit version on it thank you Cyrille

Hi Ethanay :)

  • Icemouse
  • 08/04/07
  • Wed, 06/04/2008 - 06:33
okay, but I've correct you too :p. It's not Murphy's Law. It's Finagle's Law of Dynamic Negatives. To Cyrille; What we both are trying to say is, that you can make a second installation and for that matter nothing will go wrong, but it might be better to copy important data before you'll do any installations, because there's no guarantee that an installation won't damage your existing data. Experienced users will backup their systems using other methods. Clonezilla is a easy way to backup and if there will be the need, also to restore a system. Cheers, Ralf

to be safe...

  • ethanay
  • 05/20/08
  • Wed, 06/04/2008 - 00:12
if you ARE experienced, backup your partitions :) Murphy's Laws

To be safe

  • Icemouse
  • 08/04/07
  • Tue, 06/03/2008 - 16:34
If you aren't experienced backup your partitions by using http://www.clonezilla.org/, the live CD.

Yes it is

  • Icemouse
  • 08/04/07
  • Tue, 06/03/2008 - 16:13
Just make a second installation and pay attention when making new partitions. You can follow the installer. GRUB will be automatically configured, so you can choose between the 64bit and 32bit version. Try 2.1rc, it's stable. Cheers, Ralf