Drive won't mount

  • Pelicandriver
Posted: Sat, 07/05/2008 - 16:06
I'm fairly new to Linux. Original configuration: 80G ide, 250G sata, 2nd 250G sata. The satas are used for data only. The 80 was partitioned a:s hda1 Mandriva; hda2, XP; hda3, nothing : hda4, linux swap. I installed studio64 2.01. I wanted to retai Mandriva and install Studio in hda3, but couldn't figure out how to do that. So I installed studio in hda1, formatting over the Madriva installtion. I found the formatting part of the installation confusing, but finally got the installtion done. Studio and XP both work. Studio even detected my win network! Now the problem. Studio does not see the other partiions on hda. It sees the sata drives, but will not mount them.(The satas are fine under XP) The error message says "Unable to mount the selected volume ibhal-storage.c 1401 : info: called libhal_free_dbus_error but dbuserror was not set. process 4381: applications must not close shared connections - see dbus_connection_close() docs. this is a bug in the application. error: device /dev/sda5 is not removable error: could not execute pmount " I have no idea what that means. I'm going to boot the live studio and see if the satas work there. I'm considering reinstalling studio, but I'm not sure what changes I would have to makein the partition stage of the install. Thanks for any help.

whew, good logs, anyway!

  • picothinker
  • 08/22/07
  • Tue, 07/22/2008 - 14:48
I didn't read through all of them, but here's a couple of easy things to try. Sometimes a program or one of the terminals can lock a directory or something inside it. You can list all of the file locks with the command 'lsof' try this: 'lsof' | grep '/media/sda5' | grep -v grep will list all locks on /media/sda5 If you see something like this: konsole 4011 scotts cwd DIR 8,2 20480 10125313 /home/scotts then you can kill that process number (4011 in this example) with: kill -9 4011 You shouldn't kill things as root too casually, you can bring the system down, but you won't damage anything. I found other references to Etch having the "drive busy" problem. Try this as root (or sudo before the command): apt-get --purge remove evms evms-ncurses Yes, all this seems harder than it should. Take comfort in the fact that in Linux, at least it is possible to poke under the hood on a much deeper level than Windows.

Can you see the folder?

  • gabrbedd
  • 06/29/08
  • Tue, 07/08/2008 - 22:35
'mount' is telling you that the drive is already mounted... which was the goal. If you open up Nautilus (the Explorer-like file browser) and go to the folder /media/sda5, then you should be able to see your files now. I'm guessing that you are expecting them to show up on your desktop (like when you plug in your camera or a flash drive)... but they won't. These are "permanently mounted" -- so they don't clutter your desktop with them. However, you can create a "shortcut" to those folders on your desktop if you want. ...forgive me if I'm misunderstanding something...

:-)

  • gabrbedd
  • 06/29/08
  • Mon, 07/07/2008 - 03:40
I imagine your pretty frustrated now.... :-) In the first command, there should be a space between "-v" and "/media/sdb5". That's why you got the error. In the second command, after the -t option you need to specify the file system (e.g. -t ntfs). Since "/dev/sda5" isn't a file system type... it gave you an error. In your last command... 'mount'... it shows that your drive is mounted on /media/sda5 (with file system NTFS). (Woo-hoo!!) Can you see the files? (ls /media/sda5)

already mounted

  • Pelicandriver
  • 07/05/08
  • Tue, 07/08/2008 - 21:02
Yeah, a bit frustrated now. Running "$ sudo mount -v /media/sda5" returns mount: /dev/sda5 already mounted or /media/sda5 busy mount: according to mtab, /dev/sda5 is already mounted on /media/sda5 I had just run "mount" and it showed all the drives mounted. I'm starting to wonder if it has something to do with permissions, which I've just started to learn about. Any thoughts on that?

another try

  • Pelicandriver
  • 07/05/08
  • Mon, 07/07/2008 - 02:07
I logged in as root and tryed to mount sda5 again. Here are the results. 64studio:/home/paul# mount -t /dev/sda5 /media/sda5 Usage: mount -V : print version mount -h : print this help mount : list mounted filesystems mount -l : idem, including volume labels So far the informational part. Next the mounting. The command is `mount [-t fstype] something somewhere'. Details found in /etc/fstab may be omitted. mount -a [-t|-O] ... : mount all stuff from /etc/fstab mount device : mount device at the known place mount directory : mount known device here mount -t type dev dir : ordinary mount command Note that one does not really mount a device, one mounts a filesystem (of the given type) found on the device. One can also mount an already visible directory tree elsewhere: mount --bind olddir newdir or move a subtree: mount --move olddir newdir A device can be given by name, say /dev/hda1 or /dev/cdrom, or by label, using -L label or by uuid, using -U uuid . Other options: [-nfFrsvw] [-o options] [-p passwdfd]. For many more details, say man 8 mount . 64studio:/home/paul# mount /dev/hda1 on / type ext3 (rw,errors=remount-ro) tmpfs on /lib/init/rw type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,mode=0755) proc on /proc type proc (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev) sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev) procbususb on /proc/bus/usb type usbfs (rw) udev on /dev type tmpfs (rw,mode=0755) tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev) devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,noexec,nosuid,gid=5,mode=620) /dev/hda3 on /home type ext3 (rw) /dev/sda5 on /media/sda5 type ntfs (rw)

Here are the results of

  • Pelicandriver
  • 07/05/08
  • Mon, 07/07/2008 - 01:36
Here are the results of attempting "$ sudo mount -v/media/sda5 mount: invalid option -- / Usage: mount -V : print version mount -h : print this help mount : list mounted filesystems mount -l : idem, including volume labels So far the informational part. Next the mounting. The command is `mount [-t fstype] something somewhere'. Details found in /etc/fstab may be omitted. mount -a [-t|-O] ... : mount all stuff from /etc/fstab mount device : mount device at the known place mount directory : mount known device here mount -t type dev dir : ordinary mount command Note that one does not really mount a device, one mounts a filesystem (of the given type) found on the device. One can also mount an already visible directory tree elsewhere: mount --bind olddir newdir or move a subtree: mount --move olddir newdir A device can be given by name, say /dev/hda1 or /dev/cdrom, or by label, using -L label or by uuid, using -U uuid . Other options: [-nfFrsvw] [-o options] [-p passwdfd]. For many more details, say man 8 mount .

fstab

  • gabrbedd
  • 06/29/08
  • Sun, 07/06/2008 - 17:43
That's a good try. But yeah, 'noauto' means that the drive won't mount automatically on reboot or with 'mount -a'. Set these back to 'defaults', and let us know the output of: $ sudo mount -v /media/sda5 It probably won't work... but tell us what the error messages are.

another experiment

  • Pelicandriver
  • 07/05/08
  • Sun, 07/06/2008 - 17:37
After cloning hda (clonezilla) I installed the image of the original installation of Mandriva and XP. This is the fstab file for Mandriva, which allows access to all the drives. I don't know if this info helps. /dev/hda1 / ext3 defaults 1 1 none /proc proc defaults 0 0 /dev/hda5 swap swap defaults 0 0 /dev/sda5 /media/hd ntfs umask=0022,nls=utf8,sync,ro 0 0 /dev/sdb5 /media/hd2 ntfs umask=0022,nls=utf8,sync,ro 0 0 /dev/hda2 /media/hd3 ntfs umask=0022,nls=utf8,sync,ro 0 0 /dev/hda3 /media/hd4 ext2 sync,relatime 0 0 /dev/sdc1 /media/hd5 vfat umask=0022,users,iocharset=utf8,sync,noauto,exec 0 0

more changes

  • Pelicandriver
  • 07/05/08
  • Sun, 07/06/2008 - 15:57
I tried the original changes suggested. The drives didn't show up. So I noted that other drives like the floppy had "rw,user,noauto". So I put that in the line, and the drives still don't show up. I just realized that "noauto" is probably not a cammand you want for a HD. I'll remove that and try again. # /etc/fstab: static file system information. # # proc /proc proc defaults 0 0 /dev/hda1 / ext3 defaults,errors=remount-ro 0 1 /dev/hda2 /media/hda2 ntfs rw,user,noauto 0 0 /dev/hda3 /home ext3 defaults 0 2 /dev/hda5 none swap sw 0 0 /dev/hdd /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0 /dev/hdc /media/cdrom1 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0 /dev/fd0 /media/floppy0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0 /dev/sdc1 /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0 /dev/sda5 /media/sda5 ntfs rw,user,noauto 0 0 /dev/sdb5 /media/sdb5 ntfs rw,user,noauto 0 0

Possibly just the partition ID's

  • gabrbedd
  • 06/29/08
  • Sun, 07/06/2008 - 01:28
Pelicandriver, Yeah... If you can see them in XP, then the partitions have to be FAT-32 or NTFS. It sounds like you just need to add them to your /etc/fstab file if they're not already there. That file is similar to "drive mapping" in Windows. To add them to fstab, first make the directories where you'll access them: $ mkdir /media/hda2 /media/sda5 /media/sdb5 Now add these lines to /etc/fstab /dev/hda2 /media/hda2 ntfs defaults 0 0 /dev/sda5 /media/sda5 ntfs defaults 0 0 /dev/sdb5 /media/sdb5 ntfs defaults 0 0 (Note: check to see if /dev/hda2 an the rest are already there... if they are, then we've got a different problem.) Once you've added the lines, do: $ sudo mount -a If it works, it won't say anything. It only says something if there's a problem. If it works.... then look in /media/hda2 and the rest to see your files. They'll now be there every time you boot. Good luck!

I ran the mkdr command in

  • Pelicandriver
  • 07/05/08
  • Sun, 07/06/2008 - 15:24
I ran the mkdr command in root. ( I hope that was how I was supposed to do it.) This is the file before modification. I'll save that with a different name before making the modifications. # /etc/fstab: static file system information. # # proc /proc proc defaults 0 0 /dev/hda1 / ext3 defaults,errors=remount-ro 0 1 /dev/hda3 /home ext3 defaults 0 2 /dev/hda5 none swap sw 0 0 /dev/hdd /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0 /dev/hdc /media/cdrom1 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0 /dev/fd0 /media/floppy0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0 /dev/sdc1 /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0

changes made

  • Pelicandriver
  • 07/05/08
  • Sun, 07/06/2008 - 15:31
Here's what it lookis like now. I'll reboot and see what happened. # /etc/fstab: static file system information. # # proc /proc proc defaults 0 0 /dev/hda1 / ext3 defaults,errors=remount-ro 0 1 /dev/hda2 /media/hda2 ntfs defaults 0 0 /dev/hda3 /home ext3 defaults 0 2 /dev/hda5 none swap sw 0 0 /dev/hdd /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0 /dev/hdc /media/cdrom1 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0 /dev/fd0 /media/floppy0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0 /dev/sdc1 /media/usb0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0 /dev/sda5 /media/sda5 ntfs defaults 0 0 /dev/sdb5 /media/sdb5 ntfs defaults 0 0

See if this helps...

  • gabrbedd
  • 06/29/08
  • Sat, 07/05/2008 - 16:47
Hi Pelicandriver, http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=132094 It starts by running: sudo fdisk -l And looking at the output. If you don't understand... post your output here.

ran fdisk

  • Pelicandriver
  • 07/05/08
  • Sat, 07/05/2008 - 22:53
Oops! I thought the satas were linux, but they're NTFS. Mandriva, and a previous Ubuntu played nice with them. Could it be that Studio64 doesn't like NTFS? I'll study these results later and see if I can understand them. Thanks for your replies everybody. Disk /dev/sda: 250.0 GB, 250059350016 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1 2 30401 244188000 f W95 Ext'd (LBA) /dev/sda5 2 30401 244187968+ 7 HPFS/NTFS Disk /dev/sdb: 250.0 GB, 250059350016 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sdb1 2 30401 244188000 f W95 Ext'd (LBA) /dev/sdb5 2 30401 244187968+ 7 HPFS/NTFS Disk /dev/hda: 80.0 GB, 80026361856 bytes 16 heads, 63 sectors/track, 155061 cylinders Units = cylinders of 1008 * 512 = 516096 bytes Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/hda1 1 23779 11984458+ 83 Linux /dev/hda2 * 23779 84724 30716280 7 HPFS/NTFS /dev/hda3 84724 148650 32218357+ 83 Linux /dev/hda4 148650 155056 3229065 5 Extended /dev/hda5 148650 155056 3229033+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris paul@64studio:~$ sudo fdisk -l

which type of partitions?

  • Quentin Harley
  • 05/24/07
  • Sat, 07/05/2008 - 16:41
NTFS partitions might be problematic...

The only NTFS is hda2, the

  • Pelicandriver
  • 07/05/08
  • Sat, 07/05/2008 - 22:36
The only NTFS is hda2, the XP partition. The others are linux partitions.

update

  • Pelicandriver
  • 07/05/08
  • Sat, 07/05/2008 - 16:38
I booted up the Studio64 live cd. None of the drives would mount. But, it could see the network. I then booted the Mandriva live. It could access all the drives and partitions.